Author

manthestove

Few weeks ago I had the chance to travel to Sao Paulo for a business trip.  No… unfortunately I did not go to the World Cup, I was there few days before it actually started.   The business part of the trip kepts us pretty busy and I had not had the chance to properly research where to head out for dinner.    Nevertheless a mix of recommendations by our business partners, concierge, and pure luck yielded some awesome dining experiences.  On the way back I did check the Tripadvisor page and it seems we hit few of the best restaurants in Sao Paulo. Few of the highlights…

Figueira Rubaiyat

One of premier restaurants in Sao Paulo. Great looking crowd, great food, and in a great neighborhood. Price is a bit on “holy #$#@”, but definitely a great experience. We got a table under the massive fig tree.

 

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Churrascaria Vento Haragano

Holy… wow… We went here the first night.  It comes with pick up and drop off (it seems a standard service that the nice Churrascarias provide).   Place was simply amazing.  The buffet selection of appetizers and sides has an outstanding selection.  The meat keeps coming and coming… and coming… and coming.  Luckily we had bunch of meetings and skipped lunch that day.   Highly recommended.

 

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Vila Madalena

According to Wikipedia: [mk_blockquote style=”quote-style” font_family=”none” text_size=”12″ align=”left”]These neighborhoods have become a hot spot for artists, writers, journalists, movie directors, intellectuals in general and, of course, wannabes in every one of these categories. It’s not uncommon to run into someone famous – or nearly so – when casually drinking in a bar, leaving the supermarket or having an espresso[/mk_blockquote] Well… we didn’t see anybody famous, but we did a great time walking around and stopping at one of the bars for few cold beers.

 

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La Maison est Tombee

We literally stumbled accidentally at La Maison.  We were in a cab and asked the driver to drop us off in a restaurant area.  He dropped us off around the corner where there are several nice restaurants, but they felt a bit cozy and elegant.   The noise from La Maison pulled us there.

Mostly a French inspired bistro it features great drinks, food, a warm happening environment and diverse crowd. 

Recommended for a more casual fun evening.

This is a simple, quick and tasty dish for a rainy day (which happens a lot in Seattle) lunch.

The one tip is to use one pan to cook the mix greens and than the sausages. Finally use a bit of chicken stock to deglaze the pan. It’d result in a very thick and flavorful sauce that you can use on the sausage and polenta.

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credits to jurek_durczak

This past weekend I was talking about Bourbon vs Ryes with a few friends (we were in a house in the Pacific Coast for razor clamming…and bourbon in the evening was a nice complement).

In somewhat a timely coincidence the guys at seriouseats just posted a fantastic primer about Bourbon. You can find it here.

So What is bourbon?

In brief, bourbon is a whiskey, made predominantly from corn and aged in charred oak barrels

or in more legal speaks:

Made from a grain mixture that is at least 51% corn. (Other grains in the mix may include wheat, rye, malted rye, and malted barley, in any combination.)
Aged in new charred-oak barrels.
Distilled to no more than 160 proof, or 80% alcohol by volume (ABV). In practice, most bourbon is distilled out at a lower proof than this.
Entered into the barrel for aging at a proof no higher than 125 (62.5% ABV).
Bottled at no less than 80 proof (40% ABV).

Where is bourbon made?
The other interesting thing is that you might assume that Bourbon is from Kentucky… well, not necessarily. Although the number one producing state is Kentucky (given the abundance of corn and iron-less water) it is also made in other states. There seems to be a distillery even in Washington State (Woodinville Whiskey).

Interesting factoid.
One final interesting fact that the article covers is the fact that most of the bourbons are made with GMO corn. One of the two distillery that do not use GMO corn is Wild Turkey – which happens to be owned by the Campari Group.

Anyway, head over to the seriouseats post to learn more good stuff!

btw… this is what we were drinking in Seabrook.

credits to sidereal

If you are in the market for a bourbon… here’re some ideas.

all: bourbon

Prices

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This past weekend we headed out to the Pacific coast for a razor clamming gateway. This was my first time, but fortunately our friends had been there before. “Razor clamming” is essentially the harvesting of the pacific razor clam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_razor_clam). In Washington State the harvesting of razor clams in is highly regulated. You can find location and dates here: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/. You will also need to get a Wild ID.

One of the things that early on sounded very restricting is that you can also catch up to 15 clams a day. It sounded very little…well it’s not. In a couple of hours it is not easy for beginners to even get to ten.

We headed to Seabrook. Housing is great there, easy access to a great beach with little day traffic, and pricing is great as well.

We lucked out with the weather. It was sunny and warm all weekend, which made the morning activities much easier and a lot more fun.

As for the actual cooking. We lightly fried the clams in butter after buttering them in a mix of thick cornmeal, flour, pepper and salt. The sauce was mix of mayo, wasabi, lime juice, and spicy sauce.

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We are in a business trip in the Bay Area. On the way from the airport (Oakland) we were passing through Fremont and I remembered that the city is essentially the west coast capital of Afghanistan. So I called H and got the name of the the locals favorite Afghan restaurant: Salang.

We ordered Mantu for appetizer (afghan ravioli with a light white beef sauce and yogurt dressing). We followed with Chapli Kabab (very fine ground beef mix with lots of herbs and bread crumbs and than grilled) and Qabili Rice (basmati rice with lamb, nuts, mix raising, and shaved carrots).

One quick note. Alcohol is not sold in the restaurant, but you can bring your own bottles (and I believe there is no corkage fee).

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My grandma cooks baccala’ in a variety of ways. Once in a while she also made pasta with it.

The recipe I used is not quite what she did, but it was heavily inspired by her cooking.

Note that in this case I used a standard tomato sauce as the main base for the sauce. in other words I had already made a standard tomato sauce and I used that one with the baccala.

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Bacalao a bras was one of my favorite dishes when I was living in Lisbon.

From wikipedia: ” is one of the most popular ways to prepare codfish in Portugal. It is made from shreds of salted cod (bacalhau), onions and thinly chopped (matchstick sized) fried potatoes in a bound of scrambled eggs. It is usually garnished with black olives and sprinkled with fresh parsley. It is a very common dish in cafes and restaurants as well as households through Portugal as a lunch option. The origin of the recipe is uncertain, but it is said to have originated in Bairro Alto, an old quarter of Lisbon. The noun “Brás” (or sometimes Braz) is supposedly the surname of its creator.”

Although most suggest to keep the bacalao in water for at least 24hr I usually do it for at least 48 hours. I change the water 2-3 times/day.

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There are lots and lots of different ways to make scrambled eggs. It really depends on how you like your scrambled eggs. Some like them a bit runny, some a bit rougher, etc…

Here’re some of our favorite scrambled eggs videos.

 

 

Chef Gordon Ramsey. Sunday morning scrambled eggs.


 

 

Food Network. Scrambled eggs over asparagus

 

 

Jeffrey Saad. How to scramble eggs.

 

 

How to scramble eggs in the microwave in 30secs.

 

 

Perfect Scrambled Eggs with Wylie Dufresne.