Category

Recipes

When I was a kid in Italy, the end of August was the time to can tomatoes which would last us through the winter. It was family and friends affair and took us all day from 6am through the evening.

We used to make 2 types: diced tomatoes (pomodori a pezzetti) and crushed tomatoes (pomodori passati).

This past weekend we re-engaged in the tradition. We had few friend over, got together in the morning – a more casual 10.30am – had lunch and dinner together. Yes, we also managed to can the tomatoes!

Being the first time we learned a bit and we’ll be more prepared next time. Nevertheless we had a ton of fun.

 

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This is a take on a very traditional dish from Abruzzo.

Ingredients for two people:

  • 2 tbs extra virgin olive oil
  • one clove of garlic
  • 3-4 anchovy fillets
  • Couple of dry spicy chillies (feel free to use more!)
  • a generous bunch of italian parsley (also known as flat parsley).  Roughly chopped.
  • about 200gr pasta (a bit less than 1/2 pound)

Really easy on the execution side.

  1. Bring water to boil and put the pasta in
  2. Slowly cook the chopped garlic, anchovies, and chilies. I usually start it over medium heat and as soon as it gets hot (you see the garlic starts to fry a bit) I lower the heat to a simmer.  Let is simmer until the pasta is cooked (about 12mins)
  3. Drain the pasta and our in the oil mix
  4. Quickly stir it and add the parsley

 

Done!

 

This is a simple, quick and tasty dish for a rainy day (which happens a lot in Seattle) lunch.

The one tip is to use one pan to cook the mix greens and than the sausages. Finally use a bit of chicken stock to deglaze the pan. It’d result in a very thick and flavorful sauce that you can use on the sausage and polenta.

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This past weekend we headed out to the Pacific coast for a razor clamming gateway. This was my first time, but fortunately our friends had been there before. “Razor clamming” is essentially the harvesting of the pacific razor clam (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pacific_razor_clam). In Washington State the harvesting of razor clams in is highly regulated. You can find location and dates here: http://wdfw.wa.gov/fishing/shellfish/razorclams/. You will also need to get a Wild ID.

One of the things that early on sounded very restricting is that you can also catch up to 15 clams a day. It sounded very little…well it’s not. In a couple of hours it is not easy for beginners to even get to ten.

We headed to Seabrook. Housing is great there, easy access to a great beach with little day traffic, and pricing is great as well.

We lucked out with the weather. It was sunny and warm all weekend, which made the morning activities much easier and a lot more fun.

As for the actual cooking. We lightly fried the clams in butter after buttering them in a mix of thick cornmeal, flour, pepper and salt. The sauce was mix of mayo, wasabi, lime juice, and spicy sauce.

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My grandma cooks baccala’ in a variety of ways. Once in a while she also made pasta with it.

The recipe I used is not quite what she did, but it was heavily inspired by her cooking.

Note that in this case I used a standard tomato sauce as the main base for the sauce. in other words I had already made a standard tomato sauce and I used that one with the baccala.

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Bacalao a bras was one of my favorite dishes when I was living in Lisbon.

From wikipedia: ” is one of the most popular ways to prepare codfish in Portugal. It is made from shreds of salted cod (bacalhau), onions and thinly chopped (matchstick sized) fried potatoes in a bound of scrambled eggs. It is usually garnished with black olives and sprinkled with fresh parsley. It is a very common dish in cafes and restaurants as well as households through Portugal as a lunch option. The origin of the recipe is uncertain, but it is said to have originated in Bairro Alto, an old quarter of Lisbon. The noun “Brás” (or sometimes Braz) is supposedly the surname of its creator.”

Although most suggest to keep the bacalao in water for at least 24hr I usually do it for at least 48 hours. I change the water 2-3 times/day.

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